FROM THE ARCHIVES: 70 Years Ago

At right: Laid up in 1950, the S.S. Norwich Victory was reactivated in 1969 for the Vietnam War. Grounded at Da Nang in October of that year, she was refloated and towed to Yokosuka, sold at auction, and scrapped at Hiroshima. (Courtesy of California Shipbuilding Corp.)

At right: Laid up in 1950, the S.S. Norwich Victory was reactivated in 1969 for the Vietnam War. Grounded at Da Nang in October of that year, she was refloated and towed to Yokosuka, sold at auction, and scrapped at Hiroshima. (Courtesy of California Shipbuilding Corp.)

One of 150 Victory Ships named for U.S. colleges and universities, the S.S. Norwich was launched February 24, 1945. With a top speed of 15 knots, the Victorys (VC2) were designed to replace the slower Liberty Ships, many of which had been sunk by German U-boats. Outfitted with one 5-inch stern gun, one 3-inch bow gun, and eight 20-mm machine guns, these 10,800-ton cargo vessels carried ammunition and mortar to Allied forces in the Pacific Theater of Operations from January 1944 through the end of the war. Representing Norwich at her launch were Col Frank P. Snow, USMC ’17, and Joseph C. Coulombe ’05. – d.l.w.

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