SPINNING THE RECORD – SPRING 2016

Diana WegglerIf I had to describe Carol Todd in a single word, it would be “gracious.” In everything she did, in everything she said, and especially in how she dressed, Carol exuded grace, charm, and impeccable taste. I admired her for this.

Carol’s persona was honed during her many years as an Army wife. Married to a high-ranking officer, it was her duty to make others on the base feel welcomed, comfortable, and cared for. She no doubt hosted hundreds of tea parties in her home, entertaining the other officers’ wives. I picture her pouring tea from a silver teapot into dainty porcelain teacups.

My most frequent interactions with Carol were at Board of Fellows Medallion Dinners. I would seek her out (she was never hard to find; her beautiful white hair stood out in the crowd), and she would greet me with a huge smile and sparkling eyes, making me feel like her dearest friend. She would ask me how I was getting along at Norwich, what projects I was working on, and how my family was. I would become breathless answering her questions. Before long, she would be spotted by another admirer, and a new conversation would begin.

Of my parents’ generation, Carol came of age during a time when it was unfashionable for married women to pursue professional careers. Instead, like so many other bright, educated women, she wielded her influence by forging a career in volunteerism, heading up boards and committees wherever her husband was called to serve. A force multiplier, she devoted her years at Norwich to developing volunteerism in others.

Carol’s legacy of service to Norwich lives on in perpetuity—in the Kreitzberg Library, in the Center for Civic Engagement, in the Sullivan Museum, in the Todd Lecture Series, and in the countless programs, organizations, and initiatives she guided and supported.

Because behind all that grace and charm lay a force to be reckoned with. If Carol was anything, she was a catalyst for positive change, a brilliant spark that ignited others to action. In another era, she might well have run for public office, perhaps even for president. Fortunately for Norwich, she kept her sights close to home.

May Carol Todd’s exemplary life serve as a beacon for the rest of us, lighting the path to a brighter future for all.
If I had to describe Carol Todd in a single word, it would be “gracious.” In everything she did, in everything she said, and especially in how she dressed, Carol exuded grace, charm, and impeccable taste. I admired her for this.

Carol’s persona was honed during her many years as an Army wife. Married to a high-ranking officer, it was her duty to make others on the base feel welcomed, comfortable, and cared for. She no doubt hosted hundreds of tea parties in her home, entertaining the other officers’ wives. I picture her pouring tea from a silver teapot into dainty porcelain teacups.

My most frequent interactions with Carol were at Board of Fellows Medallion Dinners. I would seek her out (she was never hard to find; her beautiful white hair stood out in the crowd), and she would greet me with a huge smile and sparkling eyes, making me feel like her dearest friend. She would ask me how I was getting along at Norwich, what projects I was working on, and how my family was. I would become breathless answering her questions. Before long, she would be spotted by another admirer, and a new conversation would begin.

Of my parents’ generation, Carol came of age during a time when it was unfashionable for married women to pursue professional careers. Instead, like so many other bright, educated women, she wielded her influence by forging a career in volunteerism, heading up boards and committees wherever her husband was called to serve. A force multiplier, she devoted her years at Norwich to developing volunteerism in others.

Carol’s legacy of service to Norwich lives on in perpetuity—in the Kreitzberg Library, in the Center for Civic Engagement, in the Sullivan Museum, in the Todd Lecture Series, and in the countless programs, organizations, and initiatives she guided and supported.

Because behind all that grace and charm lay a force to be reckoned with. If Carol was anything, she was a catalyst for positive change, a brilliant spark that ignited others to action. In another era, she might well have run for public office, perhaps even for president. Fortunately for Norwich, she kept her sights close to home.

May Carol Todd’s exemplary life serve as a beacon for the rest of us, lighting the path to a brighter future for all.

For the Record,

Diana L. Weggler

Diana L. Weggler
EDITOR

Editor’s note: A summary of Carol’s extraordinary life appears on page 46 of the printed Record. You may also read it here.

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